Dri Archer grabs attention of NFL

By Nick Shook

Read original post on TheBurr.com

Kent State running back Dri Archer is tripped up by Buffalo linebacker Jake Stockman during first-quarter action at Dix Stadium in Kent, Ohio, on Saturday, October 26, 2013. The Buffalo Bulls defeated the Kent State Flashes, 41-21. Photo by Ed Suba Jr. of the Akron Beacon Journal. Photo courtesy of MCT Campus.

Kent State running back Dri Archer is tripped up by Buffalo linebacker Jake Stockman during first-quarter action at Dix Stadium in Kent, Ohio, on Saturday, October 26, 2013. The Buffalo Bulls defeated the Kent State Flashes, 41-21. Photo by Ed Suba Jr. of the Akron Beacon Journal. Photo courtesy of MCT Campus.

In September of 2012, Dri Archer was just starting a record-breaking season as the Flashes’ do-everything back. Archer already had two kick returns for touchdowns under his belt and was quickly becoming the Flashes’ catalyst. National media took notice, honoring him with weekly special teams and all-purpose awards.

I took to the airwaves and social media to declare Archer the fastest man in college football. At the time, Oregon’s DeAnthony Thomas was the center of attention, even being featured in an ESPN the Magazine article about pure speed in college football. He was the consensus pick for fastest man in the NCAA. Continue reading

Wells Report reveals cowards inside Miami Dolphins locker room

Tackle Jonathan Martin, right, in his stance before ball is snapped during Miami Dolphins practice at the Dolphins training facility at NSU in Davie, Florida, Tuesday, July 23, 2013. Photo by Joe Rimkus Jr. of the Miami Herald. Photo courtesy of MCT Campus.

Tackle Jonathan Martin, right, in his stance before ball is snapped during Miami Dolphins practice at the Dolphins training facility at NSU in Davie, Florida, Tuesday, July 23, 2013. Photo by Joe Rimkus Jr. of the Miami Herald. Photo courtesy of MCT Campus.

Jonathan Martin did the right thing.

When the Miami Dolphins’ starting left tackle slammed his food tray down in frustration and abruptly left the facility’s cafeteria, and ultimately, the organization, he was doing the right thing.

When Martin drove to the gas station, bought a bottle of vodka that he did not drink, saw a movie, bought a sandwich and later checked himself into a hospital because he felt he was acting irrationally, he was doing the right thing.

The ensuing forest fire of debate and national scrutiny surrounding the Dolphins’ sudden bullying scandal was not Martin’s fault. He didn’t wish for any of that to occur. He had simply had enough, and finally decided to do something about it.

After reading snippets from the Wells Report, released last week after a months-long investigation into the Dolphins’ locker room, I was disturbed, but not entirely shocked. Because I knew, on a much lesser scale and for a much shorter amount of time, how it felt to be Jonathan Martin.

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